The Maryland Grazers Network

Grazing cows lowers costs for feed, fertilizer, pesticides, and equipment, and produces less nutrient and sediment pollution. Photo credit iStock

Logo: Maryland Grazers Network  The Maryland Grazers Network is a mentorship program that pairs experienced livestock, dairy, sheep, and poultry producers with farmers who want to learn new grazing skills. The Grazers Network Project Team provides technical assistance and includes experts in pasture and forage management, financial management, marketing, and funding resources. Developed by Clagett Farm and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Network is a collaboration of CBF, University of Maryland Extension, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Download the brochure (PDF, 108 KB, 2pgs)

For more information, contact Michael Heller at mheller@cbf.org.

The Grazers Network also provides funds for the Amazing Grazing Directory which lists 120 grazers in Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Mountains-to-Bay Grazers Alliance Supports Farmers Interested in Grazing

Thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), a new alliance is providing farmers with information, resources, and assistance to expand livestock grazing efforts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

The Mountains-to-Bay Grazers Alliance includes CBF, Virginia Forage and Grassland Council, Future Harvest–Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture, University of Maryland Extension, Red Barn Consulting, Maryland Grazers Network, Maryland-Delaware Forage Council, and Capital Resource Conservation and Development Area Council, Inc. The grant will allow the Grazers Alliance to support farmers interested in grazing, and so increase the number of pasture-based livestock operations in the Bay watershed portions of Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.

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