Statement Following Release of USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project Report

Press Statement
March 15, 2011

CBF Issues Statement Following Release of USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project Report

(ANNAPOLIS, MD)���Chesapeake Bay Foundation President William C. Baker and Federal Affairs Director Doug Siglin issued these statements following the release of USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project report. A more detailed analysis will be available after further review of the report.

Will Baker said:

"With 80 percent of the cropland needing additional treatment, this report clearly shows that there is more work to be done to reduce pollution from agriculture. And farmers who work on thin margins need public assistance to help pay for the cost of pollution-reduction practices. Farmers and clean water will suffer if a significant part of that assistance is eliminated as a result of the Goodlatte amendment. Local and state governments, farmers, and other small businesses could lose up to $300 million this year alone under the Goodlatte proposal."

Doug Siglin added:

"CBF concurs with the report's conclusion that targeting technical assistance and funding on farmland with the highest needs, as well as installing a suite of conservation practices, will provide the most pollution reduction. It was instructive to learn that, per acre, cropland in the Bay region produces more pollution than cropland in the Upper Mid-West. This clearly reinforces the need for more and better technical and financial assistance through the Farm Bill and other programs."

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