Volunteers Clean Up, Plant Trees Along Smith Creek

Press Release
November 6, 2012

Volunteers Clean Up, Plant Trees Along Smith Creek

(HARRISONBURG, VA)���Volunteers and staff from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF), Shenandoah Valley Soil and Water Conservation District, and Natural Resources Conservation Service removed debris and planted trees to create a riparian buffer on farmland along Smith Creek in Rockingham County on Saturday, Nov. 3.

The volunteers, many of them students from James Madison University, removed scrap metal and old fencing, as well as planted native trees along the banks of Smith Creek. The trees will trap and filter runoff pollution, reduce erosion, provide wildlife habitat, and improve the health of Smith Creek, a tributary of the Shenandoah River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Re-establishing such riparian buffers along headwater streams is among the key strategies of the Bay clean water blueprint, the federal-state-local plan to restore streams, rivers, and the Chesapeake Bay.

Volunteers create a riparian buffer on farmland along Smith Creek in Rockingham County. Credit Cory Guilliams/Natural Resources Conservation Service

     

Volunteers create a riparian buffer on farmland along Smith Creek in Rockingham County. Credit Cory Guilliams/Natural Resources Conservation Service

     

Volunteers create a riparian buffer on farmland along Smith Creek in Rockingham County. Credit Cory Guilliams/Natural Resources Conservation Service  
Photos by Cory Guilliams/National Resources Conservation Service

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