Grant Funds Projects to Restore Hampton Waterways

(HAMPTON, VA)—The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation's Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund today announced a $200,000 grant for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) and local partners to carry out restoration projects that will reduce pollution entering impaired Hampton City waterways, restore the oyster population, and educate local residents.

Partners in implementing these programs include the City of Hampton, Hampton University, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Hampton Roads Sanitation District, NASA, Hampton Public Works Division, and Center for Watershed Protection.

"The diverse projects funded by this grant will make a real difference in cutting the pollution that ends up in Hampton waterways and the Chesapeake Bay, furthering Virginia's progress toward meeting the pollution-reduction goals in the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint," CBF Virginia Acting Director Christy Everett said. "These measures will also leave a lasting impact by educating and engaging local residents and partners to ensure restoration efforts continue into the future."

Projects funded by this grant include:

  • A citizen oyster gardening program that will restore 100,000 oysters to Hampton tributaries;
  • Installation of five rain gardens at schools and in residential areas, creating at least 750 square feet of additional stormwater treatment, reducing nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment entering waterways;
  • The creation of a 224-foot living shoreline and 2,500 square feet of new tidal marsh at Bluebird Gap Farm, estimated to cut sediment entering waterways by 7,000 pounds annually;
  • The completion of two large bio-retention projects to trap and filter polluted runoff at highly visible intersections, further reducing nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment contamination;
  • Adult education classes on environmental stewardship that result in participants completing a volunteer project within the watershed;
  • Five training programs for Hampton residents focusing on steps to take at home to reduce pollution entering waterways, and;
  • Field trips for local officials to learn about stormwater management.
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